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Yorkshire Ancestors

Family History Research

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The trail that an ancestor leaves through the Victorian period and the twentieth century is relatively easy to follow – the records are plentiful, accessible and commonly used. But how do you go back further, into the centuries before the central registration of births, marriages and deaths was introduced in 1837, before the first detailed census records of 1841? How can you trace a family line back through the early modern period and perhaps into the Middle Ages? Jonathan Oates's clearly written new handbook gives you all the background knowledge you need in order to go into this engrossing area of family history research.
Tracing Your Ancestors from 1066 to 1837 by Dr Johnathan Oates
Anyone who wants to find out about the history of their house – of their home – needs to read this compact, practical handbook. Whether you live in a manor house or on a planned estate, in a labourer's cottage, a tied house, a Victorian terrace, a twentieth-century council house or a converted warehouse – this is the book for you. In a series of concise, information-filled chapters, Gill Blanchard shows you how to trace the history of your house or flat, how to gain an insight into the lives of the people who lived in it before you, and how to fit it into the wider history of your neighbourhood.
Tracing Your House History by Gill Blanchard
Ireland has probably experienced more tragedy when it comes to the preservation of resources for family historians than any other region of the British Isles. Many of the nation’s primary records were lost during the civil war in 1922 and through other equally tragic means. But in this new book Chris Paton, the Northern-Irish-born author of the best-selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet, shows that not only has a great deal of information survived, it is also increasingly being made available online.
Tracing Your Irish Ancestors on the Internet by Chris Paton
The medical profession had as much influence on the lives of our ancestors as it does on our lives today. It occupied an extraordinary range of individuals - surgeons, doctors, nurses and specialists of all kinds. Yet, despite burgeoning interest in all aspects of history and ancestry, medicine has rarely been considered from the point of view of a family historian. This is the main purpose of Michelle Higgs’s accessible and authoritative introduction to the subject.  Assuming the reader has little prior knowledge of how or where to look for such information, she traces the development of medical practice and patient care. She describes how attitudes to illnesses and disease have changed over time. In particular, she looks at the parts played in the system by doctors and nurses - at their role, training and places of work and she also looks at the patients and their experience of medicine in their day.'rn Each section identifies the archives and records that the family historian can turn to, and discusses other potential sources including the Internet. The book is an invaluable guide to all the information that can give an insight into the experience of an ancestor who worked in medicine or had a medical history.
Tracing Your Medical Ancestors by Michelle Higgs
While there are popular and academic books on servants and domestic service, as well as television dramas and documentaries, little attention has been paid to the sources family historians can use to explore the lives and careers of their servant ancestors. Michelle Higgs's accessible and authoritative handbook has been written to serve just this purpose.
Tracing Your Servant Ancestors by Michelle Higgs
Martin Wilcox's concise and informative guide to the fishing industry will be absorbing reading for anyone who wants to learn about its history or find out about the life a fisherman and his family. In a clear and accessible way he takes readers through the technical, economic and social aspects of the story. He gives a graphic account of the development of the British fisheries through the medieval period and into the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The themes and issues that family and local historians will need to understand in order to pursue their research are a key part of the study. He introduces the reader to the variety of national and local records that are available for genealogical research and considers the many other resources that can yield fascinating information about the industry and those who worked in it.
Fishing and Fishermen by Martin Wilcox
Many family historians will come across direct links to ancestors who were affected by poverty. Yet despite the burgeoning interest in genealogy, the history of pauperism and of poor relief has rarely been written about, and no previous book has provided a guide to documents and records that family researchers can use to their trace their pauper ancestors. In this accessible and informative introduction, Robert Burlison gives a vivid account of poverty and the poor. He identifies relevant records, indicates where they can be found, and offers essential advice on how this information can be used to piece together the lives of distant and not so distant relatives.
Tracing your Pauper Ancestors by Robert Burlison
Your Irish Ancestors provides an entertaining insight into everyday life in Ireland during the past four centuries. Aimed primarily at the family and social historian, Ian Maxwell's highly readable guide introduces researchers to the wealth of material available in archives throughout Ireland. Many records, like the early twentieth century census returns and school registers will be familiar to researchers, but others have been traditionally overlooked by all but the most experienced genealogists. Each chapter takes the form of a detailed social history showing how the lives of our ancestors changed over the centuries and how this is reflected in the records that have survived, and it is in this broad historical approach that Ian Maxwell's work stands out from other guides to Irish genealogy. Your Irish Ancestors is more than just a technical 'how-to-do it' book, for it will help family historians put their ancestral research in historical perspective, giving them a better understanding of the world in which their ancestors lived.
Tracing Your Irish Ancestors by Ian Maxwell
The far north of England is a key site for family historians. Many researchers, seeking to trace their ancestry back through the generations, will find their trail leads to the north or through it. And yet, despite the burgeoning interest in genealogy and the importance of the region in so many life stories, no previous book has provided a guide to the documents and records that family historians can use in their search. In this accessible and informative introduction to the subject, Keith Gregson looks at the history and heritage of the region - of Northumberland, Tyneside, Durham, Wearside, Tees Valley and Cumbria - and gives a fascinating insight into the world in which our ancestors lived. He introduces the reader to the variety of records that are available for genealogical research, from legal and ecclesiastical archives, birth and death certificates to the records of local government, employers, institutions, clubs, societies and schools.
Trace Your Northern Ancestors by Keith Gregson
Tracing Your Police Ancestors will help you locate and research officers who served in any of the police forces of England and Wales from the creation of the Metropolitan Police by Sir Robert Peel in 1829. Assuming that the reader has no prior knowledge of how or where to look for such information, Stephen Wade explains and describes the various archives and records and provides a discussion of other sources. Case studies are used to show how an individual officer's career may be traced and understood from this research. He also explains the range of secondary sources open to the family or local historian, many of which offer a broader account of the social and cultural history of the British police forces.
Tracing Your Police Ancestors by Stephen Wade
Did you have a criminal in the family, an ancestor who was caught on the wrong side of the law? If you have ever had any suspicions about the illicit activities of your relatives, or are fascinated by the history of crime and punishment, this is the book for you.
Tracing Your Criminal Ancestors by Stephen Wade
The Second World War was the defining conflict of the twentieth century and it is one of the most popular and fascinating areas for historical research – and for family historians. More records than ever are available to researchers whose relatives served during the war. And this new book by Phil Tomaselli is the perfect guide to how to locate and understand these sources – and get the most out of them. He explains how, and from where, service records can be obtained, using real examples showing what they look like and how to interpret them. He also examines records of the military units relatives might have served in so their careers can be followed in graphic detail. The three armed services are covered, along with the merchant navy, the Home Guard, civilian services, prisoners of war, gallantry and campaign medals, casualties, women’s services and obscure wartime organizations. Also included are a glossary of service acronyms, information on useful websites, an introduction to the National Archives and details of other useful sources.
Tracing Your Second World War Ancestors by Phil Tomaselli
In the 1920s there were over a million coalminers working in over 3000 collieries across Great Britain, and the industry was one of the most important and powerful in British history. It dominated the lives of generations of individuals, their families and communities, and its legacy is still with us today – many of us have a coalmining ancestor.
Trace Your Coalmining Ancestors by Brian Elliott
Vivien Teasdale's concise and informative guide to the textile industry will be absorbing reading for anyone who wants to learn about its history or to research the career of an ancestor who was a textile worker.
Tracing Your Textile Ancestors by Vivien Teasdale
Di Drummond's concise and informative guide to Britain's railways will be absorbing reading for anyone who wants to learn about the history of the industry and for family history researchers who want to find out about the careers of their railway ancestors. In a clear and accessible way she guides readers through the social, technical and economic aspects of the story. She describes in vivid detail the rapid growth, maturity and long decline of the railways from the earliest days in the late-eighteenth century to privatization in the 1990s. In the process she covers the themes and issues that family historians, local historians and railway enthusiasts will need to understand in order to pursue their research.
Tracing Your Railway Ancestors by Di Drummond